Characterization and evaluation of the potential of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from fresh mangrove sediment.


  • Semboung Lang, F. , Destain, J. , Delvigne, F. , Druart, P. , Ongena, M. & Thonart, P. (2016). Characterization and evaluation of the potential of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from fresh mangrove sediment. Water Air Soil Pollut. 227: (58), DOI 10.1007/s11270-016-2749-7.
Type Journal Article
Year 2016
Title Characterization and evaluation of the potential of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from fresh mangrove sediment.
Journal Water Air Soil Pollut.
Label U1-Druart
Volume 227
Issue 58
Pages DOI 10.1007/s11270-016-2749-7
Type of article Avec Comité de lecture
Endnote keywords Phytoremédiation
Endnote Keywords Mangrove – Oil pollution – Microorganisms – Bioremediation
Abstract Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous and persistent organic pollutants in the environment. In wetlands and marine environments, particularly in mangrove ecosystems, their increase and significant accumulation result from human activities such as oil and gas exploration and exploitation operations. Remediation of these ecosystems requires the development of adequate and effective strategies. Natural attenuation, biostimulation, and bioaugmentation are all biological soil treatment techniques that can be adapted to mangroves. Our experiments were performed on samples of fresh mangrove sediments from the Cameroon estuary and mainly from the Wouri River in Cameroon. This study aims to assess the degradation potential of a bacterial consortium isolated from mangrove sediment. The principle of our bioremediation experiments is based on a series of tests designed to evaluate the potential of an active indigenous microflora and three exogenous pure strains, to degrade diesel with/without adding nutrients. The experiments were conducted in laboratory flasks and a greenhouse in microcosms. In one case, as in the other, the endogenous microflora showed that it was able to degrade diesel. Under stress of the pollutant, the endogenous microflora fits well enough in the middle to enable metabolism of the pollutant. However, the Rhodococcus strain was more effective over time. The degradation rate was 77 and 90 % in the vials containing the sterile sediments and non-sterile sediments, respectively. The results are comparable with those obtained in the microcosms in a greenhouse where only the endogenous microflora were used. The results of this study show that mangrove sediment contains an active microflora that can metabolize diesel. Indigenous and active microflora show an interesting potential for diesel degrad
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Authors Semboung Lang, F. , Destain, J. , Delvigne, F. , Druart, P. , Ongena, M. & Thonart, P.