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Detection of Barley yellow mosaic virus and Barley mild mosaic virus by RT-PCR on resistant barley cultivars


  • Vaianopoulos, C. , Legrève, A. , Barbier, A. , Steyer, S. , Maraite, H. & Bragard, C. (2003). Detection of Barley yellow mosaic virus and Barley mild mosaic virus by RT-PCR on resistant barley cultivars. Parasitica, 59: (3/4),
Type Journal Article
Year 2003
Title Detection of Barley yellow mosaic virus and Barley mild mosaic virus by RT-PCR on resistant barley cultivars
Journal Parasitica
Recnumber 2
Volume 59
Issue 3/4
Endnote Keywords barley|cultivars|detection|disease resistance|disease vectors|host range|insect pests|leaves|pathotypes|plant diseases|plant pathogens|plant pests|polymerase chain reaction|reverse transcription|roots|rye|techniques|barley mild mosaic virus|Bymovirus|Poty
Abstract The control of Barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV) and Barley mild mosaic virus (BaMMV), transmitted by Polymyxa graminis, is based on the growth of resistant barley cultivars. This strategy is affected by the occurrence of resistance-breaking pathotypes. To improve the identification of these viruses, traditionally detected by symptom expression and ELISA, and for a better understanding of the interactions between barley genotypes and various pathotypes, a broad-spectrum RT-PCR was developed, targeting the conserved 3'-end of virus RNA-1. The method was tested and validated using plants collected from three fields naturally infested with different pathotypes in Belgium. In addition, 368 root and leaf samples collected during the 2002-03 season in cultivar trials set up in each of these fields was submitted to RNA extraction from both the leaves and roots prior to RT-PCR. The barley cultivars Carola, Hiberna, Tiffany, Tokyo and Uschi, harbouring different major resistance genes to bymoviruses, were tested. BaYMV and BaMMV were detected by RT-PCR in all cultivars under controlled conditions, a result that differed from ELISA results and field observations. BaYMV was also detected in rye, indicating that the host range for the virus and its vector might be larger than previously thought. One-hundred soil samples from the Walloon region in Belgium are under screening, with a view to identifying possible new pathotypes.
Notes Cited Reference Count: 19 ref. Journal article, Conference paper English
Author address Unite de phytopathologie, Universite catholique de Louvain, UCL, Louvain, Belgium.
Fichier
Lien ://20053060331
Authors Vaianopoulos, C. , Legrève, A. , Barbier, A. , Steyer, S. , Maraite, H. & Bragard, C.