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The beet soilborne pomovirus in Belgium and relationship with rhizomania


  • Stas, A. , Meunier, A. , Schmit, J. , Marlier, A. , Steyer, S. & Bragard, C. (2001). The beet soilborne pomovirus in Belgium and relationship with rhizomania. Mededelingen - Faculteit Landbouwkundige en Toegepaste Biologische Wetenschappen, Universiteit Gent, 66: (2a),
Type Journal Article
Year 2001
Title The beet soilborne pomovirus in Belgium and relationship with rhizomania
Journal Mededelingen - Faculteit Landbouwkundige en Toegepaste Biologische Wetenschappen, Universiteit Gent
Recnumber 5
Volume 66
Issue 2a
Endnote Keywords nucleotide sequences|plant diseases|plant pathogens|sugarbeet|temperature|beet soil-borne virus|beet virus Q|Benyvirus|Pomovirus|
Abstract A study was conducted in 2000 to determine the extent of beet soil-borne virus (BSBV) and the beet virus Q (BVQ) in sugarbeet fields in Belgium to evaluate their possible competitive or synergistic role in rhizomania disease. Among the 80 fields tested for BSBV presence, 55% were detected positive by ELISA. Using primers targeting BSBV RNA-1 helicase domain, >85% were identified positive, showing the expected 400-bp fragment. Hence, fields contaminated by BSBV were found in most of the sugarbeet-growing areas in Belgium. The level of sequence identities compared to the German "Ahlum" reference isolate ranked from 98.75 to 99.75%, indicating a strong homology between Belgian isolates. Preliminary sequence data from BSBV RNA-2 revealed more differences between different isolates (sequence identity compared to the "Ahlum" isolate: from 89.0 to 99.7%), although no clear geographical link could be attempted from phylogenetic analysis. An RT-PCR designed to be specific of BVQ identified 31 infected fields out of the 36 tested. Using primers designed to target BVQ RNA-2, only six of 22 fields recorded the expected RT-PCR fragment. The level of sequence identities verified the six samples was >99%. BVQ isolates showed less diversity at the sequence level than The preliminary comparative bio-test confirmed the better development, under artificial conditions, of beet necrotic yellow vein virus at higher temperature conditions (20 deg C night, 25 deg C day) compared to lower temperature conditions (15 deg C night, 20 deg C day). Conversely, BSBV developed better at the lowest temperature, even if its development at 20-25 deg C was rather good.
Notes Cited Reference Count: 14 ref. Journal article, Conference paper English
Author address Unite de phytopathologie, Faculte des sciences agronomiques, Universite catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud, 2bte 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
Fichier
Lien ://20023093145
Authors Stas, A. , Meunier, A. , Schmit, J. , Marlier, A. , Steyer, S. & Bragard, C.