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Description and modelling of the growth and development of the apple tree (Malus x domestica Borkh.). II. Characteristics and spatial and temporal distribution of sites of flowering


  • Planchon, V. , Claustriaux, J. & Crabbe, J. (2003). Description and modelling of the growth and development of the apple tree (Malus x domestica Borkh.). II. Characteristics and spatial and temporal distribution of sites of flowering. Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Societe et Environnement, 7: (2),
Type Journal Article
Year 2003
Title Description and modelling of the growth and development of the apple tree (Malus x domestica Borkh.). II. Characteristics and spatial and temporal distribution of sites of flowering
Journal Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Societe et Environnement
Recnumber 287
Volume 7
Issue 2
Endnote Keywords apples|branching|buds|crop growth stage|cultivars|flowering|growth|growth rate|initiation|irregular bearing|models|plant development|shoots|techniques|
Abstract Young apple trees, cultivars Cox's Orange Pippin and Jonagold, were observed during five years in Belgium and their flowering sites were recorded. By using a previously established coding system, the precise location in space and time of the flowering shoots was recorded. Two phases are described during the development of the tree. During the formation of the frame (trunk and first two tiers of branches), the first phase of flowering was characterized by a strict alternate-bearing regime in the terminal buds of the successive second and third order shoots. The eventual marked and prolonged elongation of these shoots did not hinder their floral initiation, in spite of its late start. A second phase beginning in third order and later shoots and displayed repeat flowering on mainly short shoots ("bourse on bourse"), while growth was declining under the joint influence of an increase in the number of functional apices and fruit load. Both cultivars behaved differently in the way they branched and in its effects on flowering. Cox's Orange Pippin spread its branches sympodially with terminal flowering: two to three bourse shoots sprouted from one inflorescence, with an early transition to repeat flowering and maintained vigour. On the contrary, Jonagold extended its branches mainly through axillary shoots and, without renewal pruning to sustain vigour, alternate bearing continued until the flowering rate decreased. The method described allows the characterization of varietal behavior and predicts how it can be managed.
Notes Cited Reference Count: 21 ref. Journal article French
Author address Section Biometrie, Gestion des Donnees et Agrometeorologie, Centre de Recherches agronomiques de Gembloux, Ministere de la Region wallonne, Rue de Liroux, 9, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium.
Lien ://20033139561
Authors Planchon, V. , Claustriaux, J. & Crabbe, J.